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The Great War

Tributes of Letters, Articles & Notices Published in The Morwell Advertiser

The following Soldiers are featured in this Tribute:

  • Adam, Alexander Reid
  • Alliss, George Sharp
  • Amiet, Francis David
  • Bartlett, Norman James
  • Blair, John Alexander
  • Boardman, Leslie Stephen
  • Brown, John Alexander
  • Dietrich, Henry James
  • Dusting, Henry Edward
  • Firmin, George William
  • Greenwood, Frederick William
  • Hadley, Percy
  • Hoban, James William
  • Koenig, Thomas John
  • Lamb, Robert Alfred
  • Mauer, Frank Theodore
  • Maxwell, Leslie Allingham
  • McIntosh, Harry Athol
  • Nadenbousch, Herbert Victor
  • O'Donnell, Thomas Joseph
  • Pennycuick, William Burnside
  • Porter, James
  • Primrose, William Thomas
  • Rodwell, Richard John Joseph
  • Rutherford, William Amos
  • Taylor, Henry Charles
  • Thomson, Robert Hamilton
  • Tulloch, John David
  • Willett, John William
  • Young, James Andrew
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Friday, July 6th. 1917

Killed in Action

ADAM - On 7th June, in France, killed in action, Corporal Alexander Reid Adam, youngest son of Rachel and the late James Philip Adam. Aged 28 years

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Friday, August 3rd. 1917

The Late Corporal Alec Adam

"We recently reported the sad fact that Corporal Alec Adam had been killed in action, in France. One of his comrades (Lance-Corporal Beck) supplies further details in letter to deceased's brother, in Jeeralang. He writes-" I have no doubt that you will have heard long before you get this letter the sad news about your brother getting killed. But I know that you would like to hear how he was killed. I don't know if Alec ever mentioned my name as we have been palls together ever since we were at Port Melbourne camp, and I think that I will miss him as much as anyone. He was killed on the morning of June 6th - the morning that we blew the mines up at Messines and had such a glorious victory over the Germans. I don't think that anyone who hasn't been in an advance has any idea what it is like. But we were all happy as we had been going for eight hours and never had a casualty, and had advanced about a mile and a half and were preparing to advance again when a shell landed in our midst and knocked three out of seven of us out. When we had sorted ourselves out we found that poor old Alec had been killed right out, and two more of us wounded. One thing I am pleased to say that he didn't have any pain, as he was killed instantly. I got my knock in the left arm and a small cut on one of my legs, but neither of them very serious, but bad enough to keep me in England for a month or two. All the boys will be sorry to lose Alec as a better man you could not wish to meet both as a soldier and a comrade, and it will be hard to get another man to fill his place. I managed to get his pocket book and will send it on to you as soon as I am able to get about, I know you would like to have something of his. I wrote and told his relations in Scotland and they are also going to write to you."

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Friday, 6th July 1917

About Our Soldiers

Quite a gloom was cast over Jeeralang on Saturday last, when the sad news came to hand that Corporal Alex. Adam, second son of Mrs Adam of Jeeralang, had been killed in action, in France, on 7th June. The deceased soldier, who was 28 years of age, was a resident of the district for about six years, and was held in high esteem by all with whom he came in contact. He took a leading part in all matters for the advancement of the district, and prior to the war was a prominent member of Hazelwood football team and represented club in Association. He was also secretary of sports held at Jeeralang Junction, and in sport, as in other matters, set an example worthy of being followed in every way. About fifteen months ago he went to the front, and for some time prior to his death was serving in machine gun section. Details regarding the sad occurrence are not to hand but one thing is certain, namely, that he died a true soldier's death. Much sympathy is expressed for his bereaved mother and members of family in their loss.

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August 1916

Soldier's death. Private Geo. Alliss Dies From Wounds

It is with deep regret that we learn of the death of Private George Alliss, formerly of Morwell, who died on the 24th July from wounds received whilst fighting against the enemy in France.

The deceased soldier, who was a brother of Mrs Jos. Kaye, of Morwell Bridge, was well known and most highly respected throughout the district, and deep sympathy is expressed for bereaved relatives.

A few years ago deceased sold his property here and settled in Western Australia for a time, but some months ago he returned to Morwell and shortly after enlisted. Details regarding his death are not yet to hand, a message simply being received that he had died from wounds.

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August 25th. 1916

Killed in Action

ALLISS - Died of wounds received in France, on the 23rd July. Private George S. Alliss. Aged 39 years. Beloved brother of J. Alliss (Norseman, W. A.), Mrs T. Wolfenden (Traralgon), Mrs W. R. and Mrs F. Savige (Moe), and Mrs J. P. Kaye (Morwell Bridge).

  • O what a moral lesson our gallant hero taught.
  • He knew the danger in his path, enlisted and he fought.
  • In a foreign land he's sleeping.
  • One of the dearest and best.
  • In our hearts we will miss him for ever.
  • Though we know he is only at rest.

ALLISS - A tribute of friendship to memory of Private George Alliss, who died of wounds, received in France on July 23rd.

  • 'Midst the clash of fierce battle
  • And the roar of shot and shell,
  • George, while fighting for his country,
  • Like a gallant hero fell.
  • One of the best, a loving friend,
  • A man both kind and true,
  • So deeply mourned, so sadly missed,
  • By everyone he knew.

(inserted by his sincere friends, Mr and Mrs M. Fleming and family and Mrs Noy snr.)

Thanks

The Relatives of the late Private George S. Alliss sincerely THANK their many friends for kind expressions of sympathy and letters of condolence received during recent sad bereavement.

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Friday September 22nd. 1916

"Concerning the death of Private George Alliss, formerly of Morwell, who was recently killed in action in France, news has come to hand that he died from bullet wound received in chest. He was taken to hospital, but gradually sank and passed away a few hours after admission. His remains were interred in the Buillenel Cemetery."

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Friday, June 29th 1917

AMIET - Francis David

About Our Soldiers

It is with deepest regret that we record the death of Trooper Dave Amiet, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Frank Amiet of "Ayrshire Bank," Boolarra, who was killed in action in France, on 7th inst. The deceased soldier, who was a most popular and highly esteemed young man, was among the first to volunteer, and had spent nearly three years at the front, including many months at Gallipoli. Several most interesting and hopeful letters, written by him, have appeared in the 'tiser and he was looking forward to a holiday home. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents and other relations in their sad loss.

Killed in Action

AMIET - Killed in action in France, on 7th June, Trooper Francis David Amiet, 4th Light Horse, beloved son of Mr and Mrs Francis Amiet, "Ayrshire Bank," Boolarra, South Gippsland, and grandson of Mr and Mrs D. L. Jones, Morwell. Aged 25 years 8 months. After nearly 3 years active service.

  • Our bright and brave lad
  • Died for King and Australia.
  • His longed looked for furlough at last.
  • Boys! who will fill the gap in the ranks.

AMIET - A tribute to the memory of Trooper Francis David Amiet, beloved nephew of Mr and Mrs J. F. Williams, Yinnar, cousin of Signaller D. G. and Will Williams and loved grandson of Mr and Mrs D. L. Jones, of Morwell, who was killed in action in France, on 7th June.

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Friday July 13th 1917

Thanks

Mr and MRS AMIET and FAMILY sincerely thank their kind friends for visits, letters and cards of sympathy in their recent sad bereavement in the loss of their dearly loved son and brother.

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Friday, 11th. June 1915

BARTLETT - Norman James

ROLL OF HONOUR

NORMAN BARTLETT DIES FROM WOUNDS

Quite a gloom was cast over the town on Saturday morning last when news came to hand that Private Norman Bartlett, had died on 30th. May from wound received whilst fighting at the Dardanelles. The sad news was first received by the Rev. Mr Morris, who was asked to break the news to deceased's parents, Mr and Mrs Bartlett, however, recently removed from Morwell to "Sherwood Park," Tooradin, consequently Mr Morris could not convey the sad news personally, but wrote in fitting terms to the parents, who were naturally greatly upset at the intelligence.

Deceased, who was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs George Bartlett, was 24 years of age. He was a tall strapping young man of steady and industrious habits, and very highly esteemed and respected by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. He was a good horseman and was a member of the Australian Light Horse for some years. He was fearless to an almost reckless degree, and it was no doubt due to zeal and courage displayed in the firing line that led to his death.

He was one of the first to volunteer for active service and was anxious to get to the front. After arrival in Egypt he was injured through a fall whilst climbing a pyramid and shortly after suffered from measles and pneumonia. For a time he was in a very critical condition and was advised to return home with other invalids, but this he declined to do as he was bent on getting into the firing line. His letters from the front were always cheery, although dissatisfied at not seeing fighting sooner. Deceased spent nearly all his life in this district, but at the time of volunteering was in the employ of Veale Bros., general merchants, Lake Bolac. In company with eight other local lads, he was given a public send off, in Morwell Mechanics' Hall, and presented with souvenirs, prior to leaving for the front.

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Friday, November 23rd. 1917

BLAIR - John Alexander

We deeply regret having to record the death of Private Jack Blair, eldest son of Mr and Mrs J. A. Blair of Moe, and formerly of Morwell, who was killed in action last month. A brother of the deceased soldier has been wounded and is now in hospital, in England.

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Friday, May 18th. 1917, and Friday, June 29th 1917

BOARDMAN - Leslie Stephen

About Our Soldiers

Much sympathy is felt with Mr and Mrs Boardman, of Jeeralang, who have received news of the death of their youngest son, Leslie, who was killed in action in France on April 16th. Leslie was well known and a general favourite in the Jeeralang district. He enlisted when he was barely eighteen. He had been at the front almost a year and had had many narrow escapes. But now the "Last Post" has sounded for him, as for many another Australian boy. All honour to those who fall bravely doing their duty for King and country. The sad news of their son's death was conveyed to Mr and Mrs Boardman by the Rev. A. E. Adeney.

During the week Mr and Mrs Boardman, of Jeeralang, received the following letter from Lieut. C. C. Thomas, regarding the death of their son, Private Les. Boardman, who was recently killed in action.

  • France,
  • 25th April 1917.
  • Mr and Mrs Boardman.
  • Dear Sir and Madam,

Before you receive this you will have received notification that your son, No. 14437 Private L. S. Boardman, has been killed in action. As your son was under my command at the time of his death I would like to express to you my deepest sympathy. Your son was killed instantly and suffered no pain whatever. He is greatly missed by his comrades as he was always of a very cheerful disposition and was always ready and eager for any duty. A wooden cross has been erected over his resting place, suitably inscribed. I regret that I cannot give you the location of his grave owing to Military restrictions, but it is somewhere in the area forward of Bapuame. His personal belongings have been collected and will be forwarded to you through the usual channel. Please accept the deepest sympathy of his comrades and myself.

  • Believe me,
  • Sincerely yours,
  • C. C. Thomas, Lieut.,
  • 2nd Machine Gun Coy.
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Friday, 6th July 1917

About Our Soldiers

Mr and Mrs Boardman, of Jeeralang, have received the subjoined letter from Private E. R. Stewart, regarding the death of their son, Leslie, who was recently killed in action.

France, 8th May

Dear Mr and Mrs Boardman,- I write these few lines on behalf of the boys and myself of the 2nd Machine Gun Coy., to express to you our deepest sympathy by the loss of your son Leslie. He was always a soldier ready to do his duty in the firing line, and he was held in high esteem by all of us for his manly and soldierly qualities. No doubt he has told you in letters that we were the best of mates, and that I came from Narracan, not many miles from Jeeralang, and we always shared beds together. I do not realize what the loss of a son means to a mother, but I do know what the loss of a comrade like Les means to me. Leslie was killed instantly by a shell on the 23rd April, and he was buried in the Brigade Cemetery, and a cross has already been erected to his memory. Again we, the men of the 2nd Machine Gun Co., express our deep sorrow to you in the great loss you have sustained.

Yours sincerely,

1400 Pte. E. R. STEWART

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Friday, October 26th. 1917

BROWN - John Alexander

About Our Soldiers

"We deeply regret to learn of the death of Sergeant J. A. ("Jack") Brown, eldest son of Mr and Mrs A. A. Brown of St. Kilda, but formerly of Morwell, who was killed in France, whilst serving the Empire, on 20th September. Jack spent his school days in Morwell and was a very fine lad. He left a good position in Melbourne in order to don the colours. He received early promotion and at the time of his death was a Sergeant. He was 23 years of age. The flag at local State School which was attended by the deceased soldier was flying half mast during the week in honour of the brave boy, who in doing his duty was called upon to make the supreme sacrifice. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents in their sad loss.

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Friday, November 2nd. 1917

DIETRICH - Henry James

About Our Soldiers

"We regret to learn that Pte. H. Dietrich, of Jeeralang, has been killed in action, but particulars are not yet to hand. Much Sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents in their loss.

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Friday May 26th. 1916

DUSTING - Henry Edward

Soldier's Death

HARRY DUSTING KILLED IN ACTION

Quite a gloom was cast over the town on Wednesday morning last when news came to hand that Corporal Harry Dusting, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Dusting, of Morwell, had been killed in action in France, on the 6th. inst.

The Rev. G. Morris was asked by Colonel Hawker of Head Quarters Staff, to convey to Mr and Mrs Dusting the sad news and express regret and sympathy of King, Queen and Commonwealth in their sad loss. Mrs. Dusting was away from home at the time, but returned on Wednesday evening. Needless to say that although the news was broken in as kindly and gentle a manner as possible the fact that their beloved son had been killed proved a great shock to his parents. They knew that he had gone to France, was in the midst of danger and would do his duty faithfully, still they were always hopeful that he would one day return after the war and victory, and were looking forward with great hopes to that glad day. It, however, was consoling to them to know that their boy died bravely fighting for the Empire, and that he had given his life in the cause of justice, liberty and freedom.

This deceased lad who was only about 20 years of age, was one of the very first volunteers from this district and left Australia with the first "contingent" of troops. He was recently promoted to the rank of Corporal, and had he been spared would no doubt have received further stripes ere long, which is only proof that he had done his duty faithfully and well and had merited the confidence and approval of his superior officers.

Prior to enlisting he was employed by Messrs Noy and Nash, of Morwell, (who by the way employed the late Private Norman Bartlett, who also died of wounds received at the front) and among his many friends there are none who regret his death more than his old employers. He was a bright, genial and promising lad, who commanded the esteem and respect of all who knew him, and very deep sympathy is expressed for Mr and Mrs Dusting in their sad bereavement.

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Friday, June 16th. 1916

Thanks

Mrs J. DUSTING and FAMILY desire to THANK their many kind friends and relatives for their telegrams, cards, letters and expressions of sympathy in their recent sad bereavement.

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Friday July 7th. 1916

THE LATE CORPORAL DUSTING

The following letter has been received by Mrs Dusting, of Morwell, from Bombardier Reg. Olney, who speaks in the highest terms of Corporal Harry Dusting (formerly of Morwell) who was recently killed in France, by an explosive shell, whilst in action:-

As a comrade and an admirer of the late Corporal Harry Dusting, please allow me to tender to you my sincerest and heartfelt sympathy in your sad bereavement. From the day Harry joined us in this battery-23rd- he earned the respect and admiration of every officer and man of the battery, and as I write this letter from the front in Flanders I can hear words of praise from his old comrades, and there are tears in the eyes of many a strong man to-night because of our loss.

As a Bombardier performing the clerical work in this battery I learnt to know the sterling value of Harry Dusting, and I know that we all love him. I will make no statements unless I mean them, but all I wish is that if my turn comes to fall for the Empire I shall leave behind me memories such as my brother non-commissioned officer has done. His life was upright and spotless, and although I cannot perhaps class myself as a saint I know, and we boys of the battery all know, how Harry Dusting led within himself a pure and spotless life. He was our first casualty, great is our grief, but nevertheless, we are proud to know that men of Harry's type are our comrades in this war. As you can see I hardly know what to write - my great pal has gone, and I feel it, and if I can do anything at all please let me know, and I will be so glad to help you at any time. I promise you that we will respect his memory, and that we will suitably mark the resting place of our respected comrade. With my sincerest expressions of sympathy on behalf of the boys.

  • Believe me to be,
  • Yours in Sincerity,
  • BOMBARDIER REG. OLNEY,
  • 23rd Battery, 2nd F.A. Brigade,
  • France.
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Friday, April 12th. 1918

FIRMIN - George William

About Our Soldiers

Another resident of this district has been called upon Tuesday pay the supreme penalty while fighting for King and country. The residents throughout the entire district will deeply regret to hear that Private G. Firmin, eldest son of Mr and Mrs A. Firmin, of North Hazelwood, who was reported missing twelve months ago, has been officially recorded as killed. Word to that effect came through on Wednesday. This is the second son of Mr and Mrs Firmin who has fallen at the front.

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Friday, August 10th. 1917

GREENWOOD - Frederick William

In Memoriam

GREENWOOD - Killed in action at Gallipoli, 11th August 1915

Dear Fred has gone to rest but will never be forgotten.

  • In the bloom of life death claimed him,
  • In the pride of his manhood days;
  • None knew him but to love him,
  • None mentioned his name but to praise.
  • No one he loved was by his side
  • To hear his last faint sigh,
  • Or whisper just one loving word
  • Before he closed his eyes.

-Inserted by his sorrowing parents, sisters and brothers, J. J. Greenwood and family.

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September 21st. 1917

HADLEY - Percy

Died on Service

HADLEY - On 13th. Sept. (1917) in hospital, England, from result of wounds received in action in France, Percy, dearly beloved second son of William and Lucy Hadley, of Morwell, and loving brother of the late Frank Hadley, State Savings Bank, Traralgon and Neta (deceased) and Master Bernard (Morwell). Aged 22 years.

Duty nobly done

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Friday, July 13th 1917

HOBAN - James William

About Our Soldiers

We regret to learn of the death of Gunner J. W. Hoban, brother of Mr Jack Hoban, of Morwell, and Mrs R. Kerr, of Tinamba; also brother of Gunner Tom Hoban (who was wounded in April last and is now in hospital, England). The deceased soldier, who was killed in action in France, on 4th May, was 23 years of age. He spent most of his boyhood in this district, and had been at the front for some time doing his bit faithfully until he paid the extreme penalty.

The following notices appeared in the same edition:

Killed in Action

HOBAN - Killed in France, on May 4, Gunner J. W. Hoban, beloved brother of J. Hoban, Morwell, Tom (on active service of 2 years), Mrs R. Kerr, Tinamba, and uncle of Corporal J. Kerr and Private J. Kerr (on active service). Aged 23 years 9 months.

HOBAN - A tribute to the memory of our dear brother and uncle, killed in action, somewhere in France, on 4th May.

  • Just when his life was brightest,
  • Just when his hopes were best,
  • He was called from the world of sorrow,
  • To a home of eternal rest.

- (Inserted by his sister (M. Kerr), J. Hoban, Gunner Tom Hoban, nephews and nieces.)

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Friday November 2nd. 1917

KOENIG - Thomas John

Killed in Action

KOENIG - Killed in action in France on 26th Sept; Thomas John, dearly beloved eldest son of John and Ann Koenig (Jumbuk), and loving brother of Mrs P. L. Lubcke (Morwell), Mrs A. H. Vagg (Yinnar), Lily, Maggie, Charles (wounded), John and Janet. Aged 27 years

About Our Soldiers

"The sad news came to hand on Thursday, last week, that Private Thomas Koenig, son of Mr and Mrs John Koenig, of Jumbuk, had been killed in action, in France. The deceased soldier was at the front for about two years. The sad news was conveyed to the bereaved parents by the Rev. Owen. Deceased's brother, Charlie, who is also at the front, was severely wounded a few months ago.

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Friday, November 22nd. 1916

LAMB - Robert Alfred

Killed in Action

LAMB - Killed in action, France, 7th August. Private R. A. Lamb, second eldest son of R. A. Lamb, Morwell, loving brother of Azelia, Hilda, Willie and Charlie, on active service; and nephew of Mrs McCula, 250 Swan Street Richmond. Aged 25 years

Deeply mourned

The following few lines appeared in the same edition

"We regret to learn of the death of Private A. R. Lamb, second son of Mr R. A. Lamb, late of Morwell, who was killed in action in France on 7th August."

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10th August 1917

In Memoriam

LAMB - In loving memory of our dear nephew Robert, killed in action in France, 7th August 1916

  • Far away from all who loved him,
  • They gently laid him to rest,
  • And in a far away grave he is sleeping,
  • One of Australia's best.

Inserted by his Uncle and Aunt

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Friday, November 16th. 1917

MAUER - Frank Theodore

About Our Soldiers

Among local lads there was no one more determined to get to the front and do "his bit" than Franz Mauer, of Boolarra. We understand that Franz offered himself twelve times but failed on each occasion to pass muster. He, however, did not give up hope, and at the thirteenth try got through. Now, the sad news comes to hand that this loyal lad was killed in action, in France, on 4th Oct. The Rev. A. E. Adeney conveyed the news to the bereaved mother, who lost her husband some years ago and has now lost her only child. The deceased soldier, who was 24 years of age, spent practically all his life in Boolarra, and was a popular young man. Needless to say, deep sympathy is expressed for Mrs Mauer in her sad bereavement.

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Friday, June 22nd. 1917

MAXWELL - Leslie Allingham

About Our Soldiers

"It is with deep regret that we have to record the death of another of our brave and esteemed boys, in the person of Private Leslie Maxwell (second son of Mr and Mrs C. G. Maxwell of Yarra Junction, but formerly of Morwell) who was killed in action in France on 3rd inst. The deceased soldier, who was 21 years of age, spent his boyhood in Morwell, and gave up a good position on the staff in Savings Bank, Melbourne, in order to do "his bit," at the front, in fighting for King and country and the maintenance of justice and freedom, and the many privileges enjoyed by the people of the British nation. Unfortunately, like many other brave lads, Les; in doing "his bit," was called upon to make the supreme sacrifice by giving his life. He was most highly esteemed by all with whom he came in contact, and much sympathy is expressed for Mr and Mrs Maxwell in their sad bereavement. It is only a short time ago since their eldest son (Graham) was seriously wounded whilst in action in France."

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Friday November 9th. 1917

McINTOSH - Harry Athol

About Our Soldiers

The sad news reached Morwell on Friday evening last that Gunner H. Athol McIntosh, only son of Mr and Mrs H. McIntosh of Morwell, had, on 22nd Oct; died from wounds received in action in France.

The information was first received by the Rev. A. E. Adeney, to whom was allotted the difficult task of breaking the news to the bereaved parents, who were naturally grief stricken on learning that their only boy had, like many others, been, unfortunately, called upon to make the supreme sacrifice in giving his life for sake of Empire and the maintenance of the freedom and many privileges that we enjoy under the Empire's flag.

The deceased soldier, who was only 23 years of age, was a very promising young man and gave up a good position in bank of Australasia, and left a good home because he felt it was his duty to give up all in order to serve the Empire which was then calling, and is still calling for men. He was born in Morwell and lived here practically all his life, with the exception of period spent at Caulfield Grammar School. He was one of those rare young men that excelled at anything he took up, and at the same time conducted himself in such an exemplary manner that he was held in the very highest esteem by all with whom he came in contact. He was one of the fastest pedestrians in the district and prior to enlisting won a number of events, including several Sheffield Handicaps. He was also one of the best footballers in the district, and a good tennis player as well.

He was a true sportsman in every sense of the word, and in the greater game played at the Front, he acted the part of "a soldier and a man," skirking nothing and finally laying down his life for the benefit of others. He was a faithful servant of the Bank in which he was employed and received early promotion. He also took an interest in church matters and on one occasion was Secretary of gymkhana in aid of local Church of England, which was a great success. In addition he was a loving and dutiful son, and very deep sympathy is expressed on all sides for the bereaved parents in the great loss they have sustained.

MEMORIAL SERVICE

There was a large congregation at the local Church of England, on Sunday evening last, when a memorial service was held for the late Gunner H. Athol McIntosh, who died of wounds on 22nd Oct. A beautiful wreath and the colours (red, and blue) of the late soldier's battalion hung on the reading desk while on communion table and organ were vases with lillies and marguerites. The Rev. A. E. Adeney, who conducted the service, in the course of his remarks said: "We have met to-night to do honor to the memory of one of the brave men who have made the great sacrifice for King and country. In honouring such as him we honour ourselves, showing that we are not incapable of reverencing greatness. Our first words must be those of sorrow and of sympathy. Our sorrow is deep and real. We mourn one whom we knew well as he grew up among us. You have seen him at work and at play, some of you have shared with him the games of football and of tennis, which with his work were helping him to grow and develop, fitting him for that stern work of which we little dreamed.

It is hard to realise that young life cut short and his place among us is vacant. And most deep is our sympathy with his parents who have lost him on whom their hopes and their affections centred. God comfort them in this sore trial. But we are bidden not to sorrow as those without hope. He was a true Christian and for such as him death does not mean the end of all. Our faith lifts it head "Though He slay me yet will I trust in Him." "I do believe in God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and therefore in the life everlasting." "There is no death, what seems so is transition." There are sorrow and separation, grievous loss and loneliness, but there is nothing that cannot be repaired. It will be! The eternal balance swings true and those who have given their lives for duty, truth and justice shall find that God has not forgotten but has accepted their sacrifice, and has higher, nobler work and greater opportunities for those who served Him faithfully here below.

In honouring our friend who has gone from us, let us take to ourselves the lesson of his life. Let us be ready, as he was, to take our stand on the side of right, which is the side of God. We are all called to enlist in this great warfare. There can be no neutrals. Wherever God has put you, there is work for you to do, there are battles Friday you to fight. God give you grace to do your work faithfully and truly, even to the end, as did our friend."

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Friday, December 20th. 1918

NADENBOUSCH - Herbert Victor

Sad Fatality

LOCAL SOLDIER DROWNED

It is with feelings of the deepest regret that we record the death of Trooper Herbert V. Nadenbousch, youngest son of Mr and Mrs A. Nadenbousch, of Hazelwood, who was recently drowned at Ismalia, Egypt. No particulars are yet to hand, but it is presumed that the deceased soldier was bathing and being seized with cramp sank before assistance could be rendered. It is known that he had suffered from a severe attack of Malaria fever, which left him in a weak state.

He was a good swimmer and probably attempted to swim across canal, but owing to his weak condition must have collapsed or was seized with cramp and went down suddenly. He was just 21 years of age and had been on active service for about two years, being attached to the 8th. A. B. H. He was a very fine type of a young man and was held in the highest esteem by all with whom he came in contact.

For many months his parents were in a state of suspense lest their boy should be numbered with the slain in battle, but when peace was declared, their anxiety was relieved, and they were anxiously looking forward to " Herb" returning home in the near future, and the news of his death by drowning was naturally a great blow to them, and deep sympathy is expressed for them and members of the family in their sad bereavement. The task of breaking the sad news was entrusted to the Rev. J. G. Owen. Particulars regarding the unfortunate fatality are anxiously awaited.

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Friday, August 18th. 1916

O'DONNELL - Thomas Joseph

"During the week word has been received that Private Tom. O'Donnell, son of Mr and Mrs Jack O'Donnell of Morwell, is missing and naturally his parents and friends are very much concerned at the news."

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Friday, December 22nd. 1916

PENNYCUICK - William Burnside

Thanks

Mr and Mrs PENNYCUICK and FAMILY desire to Thank all those kind friends who by letters, cards and in other ways have shown their sympathy in our hour of sorrow.

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August 18th 1916

PORTER - James

"We also learn that Private James Porter, son of Mr Robt. Porter, of Morwell, is reported missing on 23rd July. He volunteered from New Zealand, but joined the Queensland forces. Further information regarding the missing man is anxiously awaited."

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Friday, September 1st. 1916

Soldier's Death

PRIVATE JAS. PORTER KILLED IN ACTION

About a fortnight ago, Private James Porter, son of Mr Robt. Porter, of Morwell, was reported as missing. Grave fears were entertained regarding his fate, and on Wednesday the sad official news came to hand that poor old Jim had been killed in action in France on 23rd July. Deceased, who was about 40 years age, spent most of his life in Morwell. He was a very popular young fellow and at one time was one of the best footballers in the district. He went to New Zealand some years ago and whilst there volunteered for service at the front, and subsequently joined the Queensland forces. Much sympathy is expressed for his aged father and other relatives in their sad bereavement, but it is consoling to them to know that deceased died whilst fighting for the Empire and the cause of liberty and justice.

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Friday July 20th. 1917

In Memoriam

PORTER - In loving memory of our dear Jim, who was killed in action at Pozieres, July 23rd 1916

  • And with the morn those angel faces smile,
  • Which we have loved long since and lost awhile.

Inserted by his loving father, brothers and sisters.

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Friday, November 9th. 1917

PRIMROSE - William Thomas

"We very much regret to hear the sad news that Corporal Wm. Primrose, son of Mr and Mrs E. Primrose of Boolarra, has been killed in action, in France. Particulars are not yet to hand. The deceased's brother George, who has been awarded Military Medal, was wounded a short time ago. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents in their loss.

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Friday, October 26th. 1917

RODWELL - Richard John Joseph

About Our Soldiers

"Another old Morwell school boy in the person of Private Jack Rodwell, son of Private R. J. J. (Dick) and Mrs Rodwell was unfortunately killed in action in France, on 26th September. The deceased soldier, who was only 20 years of age, was born in Morwell and resided here until a few years ago when he went with his parents to Tongala. His father is also at the front and was wounded some time ago. The flag at local State School which was attended by
the deceased soldier was flying half mast during the week in honour of the brave boy, who in doing his duty was called upon to make the supreme sacrifice. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents in their sad loss.

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Friday, January 4th. 1918

RUTHERFORD - William Amos

Killed in Action

We regret to learn that L-Cpl. W. A. Rutherford (cousin of Mrs Heesom, Yinnar) who was reported missing on 11th April last, is now reported to have been killed. The deceased soldier, who with others was given a farewell in Yinnar, in Feb., 1915, fought in Gallipoli, the Canal and in France. His parents reside at Minyip.

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Friday, August 17th. 1917

TAYLOR - Henry Charles

Killed in Action

TAYLOR - On the 3rd May, killed in action in France (previously reported missing), Lance-Cpl. Henry C. Taylor, dearly loved son of Mrs J. Chasin, of Tarwin, nephew of Mr and Mrs J. Hopkins, Yinnar.

A hero of the Southland, Gallipoli and France

One of the best

  • We shall hear no sound of his much loved voice,
  • Nor hear his footsteps near;
  • Only the heart's sad longing.
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Friday, July 27th. 1917

THOMSON - Robert Hamilton

Killed in Action

THOMSON - On 11th April 1917, killed in action, in France, Private Robert Hamilton Thomson, 14th Battalion, A. I. F; dearly beloved and devoted son of M. Lowe, Sale.

Sadly Missed

  • Thy sun shall no more go down
  • For the Lord shall be thine everlasting light.
  • The time was short
  • The blow severe
  • To part with one
  • I loved so dear.
  • A soldier, yes, and a hero too,
  • He played a man's part through and through
  • His actions speak, though his voice is still
  • Forget him? No, we never will.
  • In the bloom of his life God claimed him,
  • In the pride of his manhood days,
  • None knew him, but to like him,
  • None speak of him but to praise.

(Inserted by his sorrowing mother, J. L; and friends)

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September 21st. 1917

TULLOCH - John David

Killed in Action

TULLOCH - On the 19th. July, 1916, in his 31st. year, killed in action in France (previously reported wounded and missing), Sergeant John David Tulloch (our Jack), beloved youngest son of William and the late Hannah Tulloch, of "Orkney", Morwell, and brother of Christina and Robert M. (Morwell), Jim (of Heyfield) and Sam (of Adelaide).

A clean life honourably closed

TULLOCH - Killed in active service at Fleurbaix, France, July 19th, 1916, previously reported missing, Sergeant J. D. Tulloch, beloved stepson of Sarah Tulloch, "Orkney", Morwell.

Beloved in life, regretted gone, remembered in the grave.

Mater.

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Friday, January 10th. 1919

WILLETT - John William

Soldier's Death

The sad news came to hand on Wednesday, that Private Jack Willett, eldest son of Constable and Mrs Willett, of Morwell, had died in Military Hospital, Stockwell (England) on the 27th ult.

The deceased soldier, who was just 21 years of age, joined the Postal Department a few years ago, and by marked ability quickly rose in the service. He gave up a good position in Stratford Post Office in order to go to the Front. It is only about four months ago since he left Australia, and peace was declared about the time he arrived in England. His parents, naturally, fully expected to see Jack home again at an early date, and the news of his death came as a great shock to them and their many friends.

No details are to hand, but it is likely that deceased contracted influenza, which is now so prevalent in the Old Country.

Deep sympathy is expressed on all sides for Mr and Mrs Willett in their sad bereavement.

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Friday, 22nd. December 1916

YOUNG - James Andrew

"We regret to learn that Driver James Andrew Young, nephew of Mr and Mrs G. Young, of the Ridge, Morwell, died from illness in France on the 9th December."

The following death notice appeared in the same edition.

Death

YOUNG - Driver James Andrew Young died in France from illness on 9th Dec; 1916. Beloved nephew of G. and H. Young of Hazelwood, and Kitty's dear brother. Aged 30 years.

Our loved one

  • Father in Thy Gracious keeping
  • Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

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